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Taylor

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September 30, 2016

Groundwater Banking/Recharge in Action

September 30, 2016 | By |

The Orange County Water District in California is regarded as the most technically advanced water district in the world. And for good reason.

The Water District uses an incredibly advanced purification system to purify the counties water, but even more impressive is what happens after the water is purified. After purification, the water is injected into the groundwater basin to:

(1) prevent seawater intrusion into the aquifer, and

(2) recharge the groundwater basin

This is the future of all groundwater management in California.

Check it out here — you can even take a tour of the facility.

Click Here to See what Orange County is Doing

Taylor

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July 17, 2015

New Idea! Groundwater Banking in California

July 17, 2015 | By |

Click Here To Read Article California Water Banking

Quick Summary

Some aquifers are better than others at storing water. California should focus on storing water in the “good” aquifers. There are techniques to store water in these aquifers. Lets try those techniques.

My Thoughts

Groundwater banking is not a new idea. Taking the idea seriously is. A.T. O’Green and his colleagues at the University of California. They have put together one of the best groundwater articles I have ever read. What makes it so good? Most literature on California groundwater is doom and gloom. California is out of water. We need more dams. We need less dams. Save the Salmon. Screw the Salmon.O’Green gives us something special with this article. A novel idea.

While Sacramento and the rest of California drag their heels, O’Green is coming up with ideas to save California groundwater. While California wastes it’s intellectual bandwidth creating billboards with slogans like www.damrail.com, O’Green is trying to save California groundwater and agriculture.

This paper excites me. America used to be great. We used to be a country of big ideas. Novel ideas. We were not scared of failing. We didn’t settle for what had been done before. We pushed the limits.

Dams are a nice idea. But lets face it. There are over 72,000 dams in the United States. Do we need more? Probably. Is building dams going to solve the water situation in the Western United States for our children and grandchildren? Most likely not. High-speed rail and dams have one thing in common. They are boring. They don’t work. They are a product of lazy thinking. They are a product of “safe” thinking. They are the product of an entitled generation (i.e. Boomers).

If you disagree with me, please leave a comment 🙂

Taylor

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June 2, 2015

Groundwater Hack (2 of 5)

June 2, 2015 | By |

Notice: You need to download GOOGLE APPS — even if you are on an iPhone. iPhone Maps is terrible.

This week on the Groundwater Hack Series we bring the Google Map perfect GPS hack. Have you or your employees ever failed at using GPS? If you are like me, then I bet you have. I discovered a super cool way to grab accurate GPS data from your Smart Phone. When I say accurate, I mean accurate. To the freak’n inch.

GroundwaterHack1

GroundwaterHack2

GroundwaterHack3

GroundwaterHack4

GroundwaterHack5

GroundwaterHack6

GroundwaterHack7

Taylor

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May 30, 2015

Training the Next Generation of Well Surveyors

May 30, 2015 | By |

Recently, I had the pleasure of taking my nephew out on a job site. We had a blast! We surveyed a 248 ft open-bottom water well in Visalia California. Because the survey was for a client, I had to operate the controls until we reached the bottom of the well. I let him operate the controls on the way back up. He had great time, and I believe he learned a lot about groundwater.

 

Nephew Operating Well Survey Controls

Nephew Operating Well Survey Controls

Taylor

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May 28, 2015

The Bridge Slot Perforations

May 28, 2015 | By |

I have been writing about different kinds of perforations for awhile now. Today I found a new name for an old style perforation. It’s called the “Bridge Slot”. Do they still make the Bridge Slot? Not sure. I don’t see them in stalled in new wells. Mostly I see the Bridge Slot style perforation in older wells, wells that are 30+ years old.

So what does a Bridge Slot style perforation look like? Below is a picture of Bridge Slot before and after brushing.

Bridge Slot Perforatinos

Bridge Slot Perforatinos

Taylor

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May 27, 2015

Why I don’t Like PVC Casing For Agriculture Water Wells

May 27, 2015 | By |

“I don’t like the use of PVC casing in agricultural/irrigation water wells” – Taylor

I know, I know, this is a charged statement. It would probably be wiser to say nothing regarding this subject. However, that’s not me. To be clear, I am not against the use of PVC casing for all applications. There are a few exceptions for using PVC casing.

Reasons I don’t PVC Casing

Handling

Like all water well casing, PVC casing must be transported from the manufacturer to the job site and then installed in the ground. During the process, PVC casing can become cracked and broken, jeopardizing the integrity of the well. Worse yet, it is difficult to find cracks and breaks during installation because often times they only appear on the inside of the casing. The two pictures below help illustrate my point. Notice, this well is brand new.

Brand New Casing

Brand New Casing

New PVC water well screen broken

New PVC water well screen broken

Collapsing

PVC is not as strong as steel. Period. Whether your water well casing is made out of steel or PVC it will inevitably undergo a tremendous amount of hydrological and geological pressures. This is normal. Hundreds, if not thousands of gallons are racing through your casing screen ever minute. Think of a giant fire hose that is constantly pulling and pushing. Things are bound to wear out. Things are bound to collapse. PVC is weak. Steel is not.

Weak Screen

The weakest part of your water well casing is the screen. The part of the water well casing that has slits, holes, or other types of perforations. The part of the casing that produces water. The money making part of the casing. You get the idea. Because this section of casing is weak, it would make sense to use the strongest possible screen the industry has to offer (assuming the cost is equal). Again, steel is stronger than PVC.

Repairability

It is a fact of life. Water wells break. My other business is a water well repair business. I can repair steel most of the time, PVC on the other hand, not so much. PVC has a tendency to crack. And when I say crack, I mean it cracks! Like cracks the entire 20-40′ section of casing. PVC water well casing cracked

PVC water well crackedPVC water well is weak

When to use PVC Casing

The groundwater industry recommends using PVC casing when the groundwater is highly corrosive. I agree. Use PVC when you have to use it. When your water is so corrosive it would be stupid for you to put a steel casing into the ground.

GOOD LUCK!

Jonelle Hanning

By

April 30, 2015

The History of Drought in California

April 30, 2015 | By |

This current four year drought is being touted by some as the driest period in California’s recorded rainfall history. But according to scientists studying long term patterns in the West, long before the 163 year historical period began, California has endured much longer dry stretches.

In studies of sediment, tree rings, and other evidence found in nature, researchers have documented many 10 to 20 year periods of complete dry spells within the last 1,000

years. “Megadroughts”- those lasting 2 decades or longer- are a part of the West’s early history. When these occur, the lakes of course dry up and trees and plants grow in the barren lake beds. After a drought end the lakes refilll, submerging the trees causing them to die.In some locations however, such as California’s Mono and Tenaya Lakes these trees are preserved and can be studied providing accurate radiocarbon dating information.

The term “megadrought” refers to the length or duration of a drought, not it’s intensity. Historically these lengthy periods have contributed to mass migration of people from stricken areas, affecting population decline.

The two most significant droughts in California make the Dust Bowl of the 1930’s pale in comparison. In the year 830, a 240 year long drought was followed by one 50 years later that lasted at least 180 years.

Scott Stine, a professor of geography and environmental studies at Cal State East Bay is quoted as saying, “We continue to run California as if the longest drought we are ever going to encounter is about seven years…..we’re living in a dream world.” Other Bay Area scientists believe that based on the tree ring data, our current rainfall season is on track to be the driest since 1580. That’s more than 150 years before the birth of George Washington.

The drought of 1976-1977 was particularly notable as 47 of California’s 58 counties declared a local drought emergency, enabling them to qualify for State and Federal relief. This drought brought the onset of a statewide water conservation movement aimed at urban residents which was met with much success. Routines like watering lawns, washing cars, and unnecessary activities were minimized greatly. Agriculture practices also changed shortly after the 1977 drought. Drip irrigation which debuted in California around 1970 now became standard. Other technologies developed to save both water and money were supported and mandated during this time. It is interesting to note that Jerry Brown was Governor at that time and is now in the forefront of our current drought.

A dry 2007-2009 brought controversy involving the Delta water project. Consequently legislation was passed to require local groundwater monitoring, urban water conservation targets, and a plan for the future of the Delta.

It is premature to predict what impacts our current drought will have, other than the fact that numerous growers have suffered catastrophic and permanent losses. Climate advocates stress that new strategies must be implemented and that drastic ‘water stewardship’ methods must be the next chapter in California’s water story.

Taylor

By

December 6, 2014

Water Well Video of Break in Water Well Casing

December 6, 2014 | By |

Water Well Video of Break in Water Well Casing

Serious break in water well casing. This break will have to be swaged back to its original position using a water well repair tool called a swage. The swage pushing the casing back to its original position and then patched using a steel liner.

Taylor

By

December 2, 2014

Question: Can you really determine the casing diameter?

December 2, 2014 | By |

YES… because we are brilliant.

Just kidding. We are not brilliant, far from it. We use a pixel ruler as well as a actual ruler to determine the diameter of the casing or pipe/tool.

Casing Diameter

Casing Diameter

Casing Diameter

We use a pixel ruler to determine the diameter of the casing in a water well. I believe we are the only company utilizing this technology at this time. It is an extremely reliable way to determine the diameter of the casing.

Pipe Diameter

Pipe Diameter

Pipe Diameter

Determining the diameter of a pipe or tool down in a water well is helpful but not exact. It is not exact because the pipe is usually off center, which creates a shadow. Also, the pipe is not at a constant like the casing diameter is… In short measuring is very helpful but not always exact.

Taylor

By

December 2, 2014

Water Well Rehabilitation and Reconstruction Book Review

December 2, 2014 | By |

Water Well Rehabilitation and Reconstruction Book Review

Four out of Five Stars

Overview

The book was originally written in German and translated to english a few years back. It is kind of like the german secret weapon to water well rehab. All of their secrets are poured out over 342 pages. It is clear from the book that Germany is probably a little more advanced than us here out in the central valley of California. The studies performed in the book are quite impressive. Many go back hundreds if not thousands of years. Thats right, thousands. German is old. And so are their water wells.

Why Four Stars

This should be required reading for any pump company or water well drilling company. Chapters include: Chemical Aging Processes, Mechanical Causes of Well Aging, Identification of Aging, Economics of rehabilitation, Mechanical Rehabilitation, Chemical Rehab, and Prevention. My favorite chapters were on mechanical and chemical rehabilitation. The authors use study after study to argue for the best methods of rehab. It is great fun! I also thoroughly enjoyed the chapter on prevention. Prevention is a misunderstood concept in the Central Valley. For some reason, the market for preventative maintenance and upkeep of water wells has never taken hold.

Why Not Five Stars

The book is dense considering it is marketed to contractors. Lots of science, hydrology, and geology. But don’t let that scare you away. You don’t have to read the whole chapter to find the nuggets of awesomeness.